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RogerEbert.com

  • Video Interview: Julianne Moore, Oakes Fegley, Jaden Michael and Millicent Simmonds on “Wonderstruck”
    The most remarkable thing about Todd Haynes new film “Wonderstruck,” scripted by “Hugo” writer Brian Selznick, are the performances. From James Urbaniak as a disapproving father to Tom Noonan as a bookshop owner with a delicate touch, the film is full to bursting with great performances.  I spoke with Julianne ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-18
  • NYFF 2017: Odie’s Favorites and Other Highlights
    The 55th New York Film Festival has come to a close. Here are a few of my favorites and other highlights from this year. Bruce Weber’s Robert Mitchum documentary “Nice Girls Don’t Stay For Breakfast” may still be a work in progress, but fans of the iconic actor won't be ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-18
  • Patton Oswalt Brings His Truth to a Netflix Comedy Special
    Patton Oswalt has been performing in front of audiences for years, but he’s never had a special quite like “Patton Oswalt: Annihilation,” debuting on Netflix today, and directed by Bobcat Goldthwait. Filmed at the Athenaeum in Chicago, Oswalt’s hour-long stand-up set features the comedian/actor discussing the sudden death of his ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-17
  • Oscars Could Be Facing Dearth of Diversity Yet Again
    Everyone loves a comeback story, especially when a prize is in the offing. But one revival that might bedevil the upcoming 90th edition of the Academy Awards won’t be so warmly received. Namely, the boomerang return of a dearth of diversity that haunted both the 2014 and 2015 contests in the ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-17
  • NYFF 2017: Table of Contents
    The following table of contents includes our complete coverage of the 2017 New York Film Festival, as written by Godfrey Cheshire, Scout Tafoya and Odie Henderson.  New York Film Festival 2017 Preview by Godfrey Cheshire "Arthur Miller: Writer" "Before We Vanish" "Caniba" "Ismael's Ghosts" "Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold" ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-17
  • #313 October 17, 2017
    Matt writes: Annette Insdorf's new book, Cinematic Overtures: How to Read Opening Scenes, will be released next month by the Columbia University Press. Click here for a sneak preview of the book's enticing contents, including excerpts such as the following one about Werner Herzog's "Aguirre, the Wrath of God": “The beginning ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-17
  • “Blade Runner” vs. “Blade Runner 2049”
    Sometime in the autumn of 1982, I first got word on what sounded like an amazing coming movie. As I was told, the director of "Alien" had made an incredible looking feature about a Harrison Ford cop chasing Ash-like creatures (the Ian Holm character from Ridley Scott’s earlier film) called ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-16
  • CIFF 2017: Films We’ve Seen at Previous Fests
    The 53rd Chicago International Film Festival kicked off this past Thursday with an Opening Night screening of Reginald Hudlin's "Marshall" and is now in full swing. To help your planning with CIFF's national, regional, and city premieres of these many exciting films, we've compiled a list of our reviews (from Sundance, Berlin, Cannes, ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-16
  • “Blade Runner” vs. “Blade Runner 2049”
    Sometime in the autumn of 1982, I first got word on what sounded like an amazing coming movie. As I was told, the director of "Alien" had made an incredible looking feature about a Harrison Ford cop chasing Ash-like creatures (the Ian Holm character from Ridley Scott’s earlier film) called ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-16
  • CIFF 2017: Vanessa Redgrave on “Sea Sorrow” and “Blow-Up”
    Over a screen career spanning more than a half-century, Vanessa Redgrave has become one of the most celebrated actresses in the world. She's achieved this with roles in such films as “Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment” (1966), for which she received the first of her six Oscar nominations, “Blow-Up” (1966), ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-16
  • NYFF 2017: “Wonder Wheel”
    In its 55th edition, each showing at the New York Film Festival opens with a rapidly edited montage of clips that takes us back to the festival’s very first year, 1963. The visual bobsled ride down memory lane is both exhilarating and illuminating. The titles in that inaugural year included ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-14
  • NYFF 2017: “Caniba,” “Ismael’s Ghosts,” “Let the Sunshine In”
    Back in 2014, I interviewed Kent Jones, the director of the New York Film Festival, and he mentioned that he'd noticed that the aggression between civic-minded audience members and the directors presenting controversial work had more or less subsided. People don't come to pick fights with the filmmakers like they ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-14
  • Thumbnails 10/13/17
    Thumbnails is a roundup of brief excerpts to introduce you to articles from other websites that we found interesting and exciting. We provide links to the original sources for you to read in their entirety.—Chaz Ebert 1.  "CIFF 2017 Preview: 'Princess Cyd,' 'The Square' and Eight More": At Indie Outlook, ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)
    Of the many human characteristics keenly observed in “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected),” the most powerful is the lonely sense of being the only something in one’s family. The only failure, the only daughter, the only one with no artistic talent—these are traits that, whether incontrovertible or questionable, are clutched like well-earned badges of honor by the ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Professor Marston & the Wonder Women
    It has all the trappings of a tasteful period piece: the true-story origins, the tweedy collegiate setting, the to-die-for costumes. But beneath all that, “Professor Marston and the Wonder Women” aims to shake you up, make you think and maybe even squirm a little. Make that a lot. This movie is sexy ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • The Foreigner
    The turgid revenge thriller "The Foreigner" is an all-around lousy movie. For starters: Jackie Chan, an action star who is struggling to find age-appropriate roles in his sixties, is barely in "The Foreigner," an adaptation of Stephen Leather's source novel. This is especially disappointing since Chan's Sparkle Roll Media production company is prominently foregrounded in ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Breathe
    “Breathe,” Andy Serkis’ directorial debut, is an undeniably well-intentioned film. Serkis directs this true story of the parents of one of his best friends and producing partners, Jonathan Cavendish, and he does so with sensitivity and empathy. It’s hard to even imagine making a film about your parents, much ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Goodbye Christopher Robin
    The PG-rated literary biopic “Goodbye Christopher Robin” might sound like a perfectly fine choice for family night at the movies, given that it is in large part an origin tale about that beloved ursine superstar Winnie-the-Pooh. For anyone who has read aloud A.A. Milne’s sing-song wordplay to sleepy tykes at ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • 78/52
    When the latest British Film Institute greatest-films-of-all-time poll came out a few years ago, it wasn’t terribly surprising that an Alfred Hitchcock film had displaced “Citizen Kane,” which had occupied the top spot for several decades. But why “Vertigo”? If the importance of Orson Welles’ classic had stemmed from the ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Human Flow
    Few modern artists or activists have raised their middle finger with as much brazen audacity as Ai Weiwei. Twenty-two years ago, the visionary Chinese muckraker began a photography series entitled “Study of Perspective,” featuring such iconic locations as Tiananmen Square, the Reichstag, the Colosseum and the White House. Placed in ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-10-13