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RogerEbert.com

  • My Favorite Documentaries of 2017
    I can watch documentary films any time. They are some of the best things we have going in a free society where our newspapers and investigative journalists are disappearing, and our mid-range priced movies are getting harder and harder for studios to green light.  The Best Documentaries below are presented in ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Wormwood
    On November 18th, 1953, a humble government biochemist named Frank Olson fell from the 13th floor of the Hotel Statler in New York City. Or maybe ‘fell’ isn’t the right word. Maybe he ‘jumped’? But that doesn't sound right either, as it's more of a plunge than a jump. Or ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • The Ballad of Lefty Brown
    This picture asks a question that I do not think is much on the mind of contemporary moviegoers: “What happens when a Western sidekick is suddenly bereft of his Western hero?” Can a hero’s journey withstand being undertook by Walter Brennan or Andy Devine? We first see Edward Johnson and ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • The Leisure Seeker
    The Leisure Seeker is the affectionate name Helen Mirren’s character has given to the clunky, old Winnebago she and her husband, played by Donald Sutherland, have enjoyed family road trips in for years. And “The Leisure Seeker” is an affectionate film about that aging, ailing couple as they take one ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Birdboy: The Forgotten Children
    In his groundbreaking graphic novel Maus, Art Spiegelman took a giant artistic risk that paid off painfully and beautifully. The work is a remembrance/memoir of Spiegelman’s own family and their experience of the Holocaust. The risk is in the telling: Spiegelman cast it as a version of a funny-animal cartoon. ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Youth
    The story behind the Chinese government delayed (and probably censored) international release of frustrating romantic drama "Youth" made me dislike the film's toothless sentimentality and historical revisionism even more. This is a movie about three soldiers, all of whom perform, or serve in the People's Liberation Army during the mid-'70s, just before and after the death of Zeong Mao. Unfortunately, ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Beyond Skyline
    2010’s “Skyline” maintains its unique position in bad movie history as the unlikely boondoggle that somehow made you want to see a sequel. That interest comes from its final moments: the promise of a battle royale between alien monsters, one of them steered by a human's brain. The visual cliffhanger ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Permanent
    Every generation of girls has its aspirational hairstyle. I grew up on the tail-end of the Farrah Fawcett era, punctuated by Dorothy Hamill-mania and Princess Di-frenzy. My idol when I was 10 was Andrea McArdle, star of the Broadway show "Annie," who had a bob cut with a little curl ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Sundowners
    “A good movie is never too long, and a bad movie can never be too short.” That famous quote from Roger Ebert helps me explain why the Canadian indie comedy “Sundowners,” though it runs only 97 minutes, felt to me like it lasted 14 hours. Longer than “Lawrence of Arabia.” ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Home Entertainment Consumer Guide: December 14, 2017
    10 NEW TO NETFLIX "8 Mile""Brother's Keeper""Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2""My Happy Family""The Santa Clause""Temple""The Trip to Spain""Tyson""The Unknown Girl""V For Vendetta" 8 NEW TO BLU-RAY/DVD "Despicable Me 3" I have a confession: my kids love the minions, and I get it. Because of their love, I ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-14
  • Ferdinand
    Bullies in pulpits. Bullies in schools. Bullies on Twitter. Bullies in the news.   Enough of that kind of bull. What the world needs now is Ferdinand, sweet Ferdinand, a rare breed of bovine who takes a stand against aggression, competitive rivalry and conforming to the expectations of others. Alas, ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-14
  • Amazon’s “Jean-Claude Van Johnson” Doesn’t Live Up to Great Premise
    Over the past few years, Jean-Claude Van Damme has packaged himself as the James Franco of the action world, with the high-kicking, legs-splitting superstar conceptualizing his star image across various projects (sometimes by playing himself). The 2008 action-drama, “JCVD,” offered an especially lingering curiosity about what Jean-Claude Van Damme means, both to himself and ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-14
  • The Individual Top Tens of 2017
    Yesterday, we released the RogerEbert.com consensus Top Ten Films of 2017, led by Greta Gerwig's "Lady Bird." Today, we dig deeper, presenting you with all submitted lists from our brilliant critics and independent contributors. There are over 200 films cited below as among the best of 2017, displaying both the ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-14
  • 30 Minutes on: “As Good As it Gets”
    "As Good As it Gets" was on cable TV tonight and I watched it all the way through while doing other things. I think that's how it was meant to be watched, like really good but not particularly ambitious television. It's about a millionaire writer with obsessive-compulsive disorder (Jack Nicholson) ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-14
  • “Get Out” Named Best Film of 2017 by AAFCA
    Jordan Peele's “Get Out” was named the Best Film of 2017 by the African American Film Critics Association ("AAFCA"). The satirical thriller-turned-phenomenon will take home five prizes including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actor (Daniel Kaluuya) and Best Breakout Star (Lakeith Stanfield, honored for both “Get Out” and Best Independent Film ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-13
  • “Step” to Inspire Young Filmmakers at DePaul on December 16th
    One of the year's most acclaimed documentaries, Amanda Lipitz's "Step," will screen on Saturday, December 16th, at DePaul University's CDM Theatre in Chicago. The free screening will be co-hosted by the university and the Chicago Housing Authority ("CHA") in conjunction with RogerEbert.com publisher Chaz Ebert,  and entertainment attorney Brenda Robinson. Lipitz's film is ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-13
  • The Ten Best Films of 2017
    As the world grew more divisive in everyday life than it has in generations, people went to the movies in 2017 to escape, and found different ways to do so throughout the year. From all types of filmmaking, there were stories worth celebrating. The arthouse circuit delivered the kind of movies that ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-13
  • A New Frontier: Bill Pullman and Jared Moshe on “The Ballad of Lefty Brown”
    The opening scenes of “The Ballad of Lefty Brown” will no doubt seem familiar and comfortable to any viewer with even the slightest working knowledge of the Western film genre. In them, we see legendary lawman Eddie Johnson (Peter Fonda) dispensing his own brand of justice to yet another outlaw. ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-13
  • Lady Bird, Call Me By Your Name Win Big For the Chicago Film Critics Association
    "Lady Bird," Greta Gerwig’s delightful semi-autobiographical look at the relationship between an equally headstrong mother and daughter set over the course of the latter’s senior year in high school, was named the winner of the Chicago Film Critics Association’s award for the Best Picture of 2017 in a ceremony held ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-12
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
    Writer/director Rian Johnson’s “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” is a sprawling, incident- and character-packed extravaganza that picks up at the end of “Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens” and guides the series into unfamiliar territory. It’s everything a fan could want from a “Star Wars” film and then some. Even ... read more
    Source: RogerEbert.comPublished on 2017-12-12